<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Mar 23, 2018, at 1:41 PM, Brian Goetz <<a href="mailto:brian.goetz@oracle.com" class="">brian.goetz@oracle.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">I prefer the simplicity that "all expressions either complete normally or complete abruptly with cause exception."</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""><div class="">Just want to emphasize that this is a really important property of the language, and of what we mean when we call some things "statements" and other things "expressions".</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">A good overview here:</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><a href="https://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se10/html/jls-14.html#jls-14.1" class="">https://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se10/html/jls-14.html#jls-14.1</a></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Of course, we can change these definitions. But introducing expressions that can complete abruptly for control flow reasons is a significantly more disruptive change than your typical "add a new kind of expression" feature.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">—Dan</div></body></html>