<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class="">On Oct 12, 2018, at 9:47 PM, John Rose <<a href="mailto:john.r.rose@oracle.com" class="">john.r.rose@oracle.com</a>> wrote:<br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="caret-color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">Delegate</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""><div class="">P.S.  In the prehistory of Java there were serious proposals to support</div><div class="">delegation of an object's method to some "friend" (a field).  I think</div><div class="">Ken Arnold was the proponent, and I also think at least some of the</div><div class="">original JLS authors took it seriously.  But it was too much language</div><div class="">change for just one software reuse pattern, even a venerable one.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">The CMB proposal seems to fulfills this old RFE completely, and does</div><div class="">much more besides, since it handles Concepts and Prototypes also.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div></body></html>