<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">On Feb 12, 2018, at 10:52 AM, Paul Sandoz <<a href="mailto:paul.sandoz@oracle.com" class="">paul.sandoz@oracle.com</a>> wrote:<br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">If a class has no nestmates is it implicitly a nest of itself?</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""><div class="">Logically, every class is exactly one nest.  In the absence of</div><div class="">Nest* attributes, the nest is a singleton.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">There are sometimes secondary reasons to distinguish an</div><div class="">explicit singleton from an implicit one, reasons which don't affect</div><div class="">member access control.  The Lookup::in API wants to be sensitive</div><div class="">the distinction in some way, so that it can use InnerClasses</div><div class="">for old code, but ditch that in favor of NestMates in new code.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">We could ask reflection to show that distinction directly, or</div><div class="">(maybe better) we could have Lookup::in grub it directly</div><div class="">out of some secret channel.  I'm on the fence about this.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">— John</div></body></html>