<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 31 Oct 2019, at 12:21, Vicente Romero <<a href="mailto:vicente.romero@oracle.com" class="">vicente.romero@oracle.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class="">
  

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" class="">
  
  <div text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" class="">
    Hi,<br class="">
    <br class="">
    In the past we discussed about forbidding the declaration of some
    serialization related methods in records. In particular:<br class="">
    <font size="+1" class=""><br class="">
      <span class="c-message__body" dir="auto" data-qa="message-text">
        <pre class="c-mrkdwn__pre" data-stringify-type="pre">writeObject(ObjectOutputStream)
readObjectNoData()
readObject(ObjectInputStream)</pre>
      </span></font>I wonder if we still want to enforce that
    restriction, meaning that it should be reflected in the spec, or if
    it is not necessary anymore,<br class=""></div></div></blockquote><br class=""></div><div>Where we ended up with Serializable Records, is that the runtime is specified to ignore these methods if they appear in a serializable record ( there are tests that assert this ).  The javac restriction is no longer strictly necessary, but of course catches effectively-useless declarations early, and without resorting checkers, inspection, etc.</div><div><br class=""></div><div>-Chris.</div><br class=""></body></html>