Choosing which Visual Studio installation to use

Thomas Stüfe thomas.stuefe at gmail.com
Wed Feb 14 13:23:02 UTC 2018


On Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 2:16 PM, John Paul Adrian Glaubitz <
glaubitz at physik.fu-berlin.de> wrote:

> On 02/14/2018 02:07 PM, Thomas Stüfe wrote:
>
>>     Does it have to be Cygwin though?
>>
>>
>> Yes. I love cygwin. You can put it into fullscreen and pretend you have a
>> very slow Linux machine :) But seriously, it is very stable and mature,
>> would not like at all to change my environment.
>>
>
> Yes, but, if I remember correctly, the problem is that anything built
> with Cygwin always requires Cygwin to be present to be able to run.
>
>
We do not build with cygwin. We just use the cygwin tool chain (bash, make
etc) to run the make. Compiler tool chain is still Visual Studio (hence the
original question).


> You always have to carry the runtime around if I remember correctly.
>
>
Maybe if you use cygwin gcc, but the standard openjdk build on Windows does
not.

There was someone on the mailing list attempting to build with gcc, if I
remember correctly. If you are right, this would be an argument against
such a build.


>     On Windows I usually install the "git bash for Windows" package or
>> whatever
>>     it's called and it gives me a nice bash command prompt with a working
>> git
>>     and bash environment. You can then call the environment scripts from
>> there.
>>
>>
>> Can you do a full openjdk build with that?
>>
> I haven't tried OpenJDK. But in my previous company we did heavy Qt
> development
> with git bash for Windows and any additional external libraries that were
> required
> could usually be installed manually. It required some elbow grease, but at
> least
> the resulting binaries were regular Win32 applications which didn't
> require any
> particular runtime environment to be present except for the DLLs the
> binaries
> were linked against.


Neither do ours, see above.

cygwin basically gives you apt-get for windows. A very well maintained
repository of any tool you potentially need. In addition to the pure build
tool, I use ksh, diff tools, vim, mercurial, git, ... from cygwin. That
completeness together with the stability is very useful. (So, if any Redhat
people read this, thank you for cygwin :-)

..Thomas


>
>
> Adrian
>
> --
>  .''`.  John Paul Adrian Glaubitz
> : :' :  Debian Developer - glaubitz at debian.org
> `. `'   Freie Universitaet Berlin - glaubitz at physik.fu-berlin.de
>   `-    GPG: 62FF 8A75 84E0 2956 9546  0006 7426 3B37 F5B5 F913
>


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