<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">On Jun 5, 2015, at 8:48 AM, Vitaly Davidovich <<a href="mailto:vitalyd@gmail.com" class="">vitalyd@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class="">Thanks for the insight.  Do you know offhand the condition(s) that prevent updating IC call sites atomically?</div></div></blockquote><br class=""></div><div>If you look at the structure of an IC, you'll note it consists of a set-constant instruction and a jump instruction.</div><div>The jump can be patched atomically, but the set-constant cannot be part of the same transaction.</div><div>The resulting race conditions are made innocuous with lots of fiddling.  IC buffering helps do this.</div><div>The IC's can be un-buffered (to run at speed) only at safepoints.</div><div>— John</div></body></html>