<div dir="ltr">Motivated by the summary of JEP 408, I finally wrote a small blog[1]<div>about an in-memory http handler that I use for testing browsing-related</div><div>code via URL.open..., HttpClient, or other ways to read a resource.</div><div><br></div><div>The basic idea is to map a prepared response (http code, bytes, and</div><div>content-type) to a request path. For example:</div><div><br></div><div>  "/index.html" -> "<html><body><h1>Index</h1></body></html>"</div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps, this path-asset(resource)-mapping abstraction is useful for</div><div>somebody else, too.</div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,</div><div>Christian</div><div><br>[1]: <a href="https://sormuras.github.io/blog/2021-05-09-in-memory-http-server-handler">https://sormuras.github.io/blog/2021-05-09-in-memory-http-server-handler</a><br><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Mon, Mar 29, 2021 at 9:16 PM <<a href="mailto:mark.reinhold@oracle.com">mark.reinhold@oracle.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><a href="https://openjdk.java.net/jeps/408" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://openjdk.java.net/jeps/408</a><br>
<br>
  Summary: Provide a command-line tool to start a minimal web server<br>
  that serves static files in the current directory. This low-threshold<br>
  utility will be useful for prototyping, ad-hoc coding, and testing<br>
  purposes, particularly in educational contexts.<br>
<br>
- Mark<br>
</blockquote></div>